FreeBSD 11.2-BETA3 Available

The third BETA build for the FreeBSD 11.2 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, arm64, i386, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

FreeBSD 11.2-BETA1 Available

The first BETA build for the FreeBSD 11.2 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, arm64, i386, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

FreeBSD 11.2-BETA1 Available

The first BETA build for the FreeBSD 11.2 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, arm64, i386, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

ZFS User Conf 2018 | BSD Now 245

Allan’s recap of the ZFS User conference, first impressions of OmniOS by a BSD user, Nextcloud 13 setup on FreeBSD, OpenBSD on a fanless desktop computer, an intro to HardenedBSD, and DragonFlyBSD getting some SMP improvements.

C is a Lie | BSD Now 244

Arcan and OpenBSD, running OpenBSD 6.3 on RPI 3, why C is not a low-level language, HardenedBSD switching back to OpenSSL, how the Internet was almost broken, EuroBSDcon CfP is out, and the BSDCan 2018 schedule is available.

EuroBSDcon 2018

EuroBSDcon 2018 (https://2018.eurobsdcon.org), University Politehnica of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania 20 - 23 September, 2018. EuroBSDcon is the European annual technical conference gathering users and developers working on and with 4.4BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) based operating systems family and related projects. EuroBSDcon gives the exceptional opportunity to learn about latest news from the BSD world, witness contemporary deployment case studies, and meet personally other users and companies using BSD oriented technologies. EuroBSDcon is also a boiler plate for ideas, discussions and information exchange, which often turn into programming projects. The conference has always attracted active programmers, administrators and aspiring students, as well as IT companies at large, which found the conference a convenient and quality training option for its staff. We firmly believe that high profile education is vital to the future of technology, and hence greatly welcome students and young people to this regular meeting.

Understanding The Scheduler | BSD Now 243

OpenBSD 6.3 and DragonflyBSD 5.2 are released, bug fix for disappearing files in OpenZFS on Linux (and only Linux), understanding the FreeBSD CPU scheduler, NetBSD on RPI3, thoughts on being a committer for 20 years, and 5 reasons to use FreeBSD in 2018.

Twenty years

Yesterday was the twentieth anniversary of my FreeBSD commit bit, and tomorrow will be the twentieth anniversary of my first commit. I figured I’d split the difference and write a few words about it today.

My level of engagement with the FreeBSD project has varied greatly over the twenty years I’ve been a committer. There have been times when I worked on it full-time, and times when I did not touch it for months. The last few years, health issues and life events have consumed my time and sapped my energy, and my contributions have come in bursts. Commit statistics do not tell the whole story, though: even when not working on FreeBSD directly, I have worked on side projects which, like OpenPAM, may one day find their way into FreeBSD.

My contributions have not been limited to code. I was the project’s first Bugmeister; I’ve served on the Security Team for a long time, and have been both Security Officer and Deputy Security Officer; I managed the last four Core Team elections and am doing so again this year.

In return, the project has taught me much about programming and software engineering. It taught me code hygiene and the importance of clarity over cleverness; it taught me the ins and outs of revision control; it taught me the importance of good documentation, and how to write it; and it taught me good release engineering practices.

Last but not least, it has provided me with the opportunity to work with some of the best people in the field. I have the privilege today to count several of them among my friends.

For better or worse, the FreeBSD project has shaped my career and my life. It set me on the path to information security in general and IAA in particular, and opened many a door for me. I would not be where I am now without it.

I won’t pretend to be able to tell the future. I don’t know how long I will remain active in the FreeBSD project and community. It could be another twenty years; or it could be ten, or five, or less. All I know is that FreeBSD and I still have things to teach each other, and I don’t intend to call it quits any time soon.